Definition: Jesus-bombing

Jesus-bombing [verb] (also: Christianing at): The act of inserting statements of Christian faith or religious opinions into an unrelated conversation, usually for the purpose of appearing righteous, derailing the conversation, or proselytizing.  Note: this does not pertain to offering statements of faith or religious opinions in a relevant conversation regarding those beliefs or opinions.

Useage:  “She tried wanted to discuss sports, but she was Jesus-bombed instead.”
“My mother is Christianing at me.”

Example:  A mother and her atheist son are having a conversation by letters, attempting to reconcile some serious differences between them.  The son feels he has been wronged and presents his complaints to the mother and asks for an apology.  The mother replies:

“I admit I haven’t been perfect and I messed up.  I confess that I continually fail at honoring Jesus Christ.  I am a spectacular failure!  That is why I am so thankful for such a great Gospel—for it is the only remedy for great sinners, like myself.  Despite the wickedness of my heart, He is faithful.  He loves me, He forgives me and He has a plan for my life.  My life’s goal is to love, honor and desire God above all and to see and love others the way He does.  I may be billions of miles from that goal, but His grace bridges the gap and I am so grateful! “

The son has been Jesus-bombed.  Rather than addressing the son’s actual complaints, the mother indulges in an unrelated discussion of her personal religious beliefs about failure and forgiveness.  This serves the three purposes stated above:

Appearing righteous: the mother may cloak her language in faux humility, but she also eagerly discusses her special relationship with god, her dedication to him, and her position of favor with him.

Derailing the conversation: the mother does not want to actually apologize for her mistakes.  Instead she brings up her beliefs about Jesus and states that he has forgiven her, thus implying that there is no more need to dwell on her failings.  In addition, she may be Jesus-bombing in attempt to bait her son into arguing religious topics with her rather than continuing to draw attention to her mistakes and misbehavior.

Proselytizing: the mother knows that her son is not a Christian, so she chooses to bring up her faith as frequently as possible in hopes of drawing him in again.  She finds excuses to remind him of the parts of her religious beliefs that she finds most attractive (having a relationship with god, being forgiven for all mistakes, etc).  She hopes that by doing so, he will be influenced to join her religion again.

(Yeah, I’m the son in this not-so-fictional example and yeah, I’m irritated.)

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3 responses

  1. Yea, I remember similar discussions with my father. He explicitly told me all the time that I was flat out wrong, and had Bible verses on hand to prove his point. And, that was while I was still a Christian. He died before I became a full-out atheist, but now my family members are hand-waving my atheism away as being just a phase. Or, in the case of my daughter & her husband, they just don’t speak to me about it at all. That is really a good thing, since her husband is why I was a Catholic Christian for awhile. Believers seem unable to realize that former believers can actually stop believing. They think somehow we are just having some sort of temper tantrum over some perceived harm done by a church. They don’t get how long and how much investigation into our former faith we went through before emerging on the other side as atheist.

    1. And, of course, if they just bring up a religious discussion AGAIN even if you said you don’t want one, that will clearly make you convert. And if it doesn’t, then they just need to try harder!

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